Worldviews

Items in Worldviews

Thinking on the Edge

Is dualistic thinking inherent in the human mind? Certainly, we often tend to see the world in terms of black or white, good or bad, right or wrong—and this divisive way of thinking has contributed to a long-standing split between science and religion. But the next stage in our evolution, Filipek believes, will involve a more flexible kind of mind where “opposites” open up new creative possibilities.

The Way of an Explorer

Thirty years ago, he had a transformative vision: On his return trip from the moon, Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell looked out and saw our lonely blue planet suspended like a jewel in the infinite blackness of space, and knew we are part of a living, conscious universe. In this profile, freelance writer Lora tells the story of this “mystic-scientist” who founded the Institute of Noetic Sciences.

Beyond Violence?

It’s chronic. It’s pervasive. It’s almost normal. But is violence a necessary part of the human condition? One school of thought sees violence as a natural factor in evolution, pushing the dynamic of diversity between and within groups. In this lead feature, Shift’s editor McNeill presents a variety of perspectives, and asks us to consider the possibility of a world beyond violent conflict.

Living the Magical Life

Today many of us live without access to the visionary part of our psyche. We tend to think of life as being unpredictable and random--a series of disconnected events, flowing like an arrow through time. Living the Magical Life opens a doorway to a deeper vision of the world.

The End of Faith

This important and timely book delivers a startling analysis of the clash of faith and reason in today's world. Harris offers a vivid historical tour of mankind's willingness to suspend reason in favor of religious beliefs, even when those beliefs are used to justify harmful behavior and sometimes-heinous crimes. He asserts that in the shadow of weapons of mass destruction, we can no longer tolerate views that pit one true god against another.

Men in Black Dresses

If we pause long enough, we can hear, above the din of our planet's rapid globalization and technological advancement, the quiet voices of spiritual leaders from ancient faiths. Middle East historian Yvonne Seng asks, What can these modern Desert Fathers with their long history of survival advise us on the future of our planet? Her intellectual quest rapidly becomes a personal journey that turns her Western training and perceptions on their head.

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